Comment on ONS alcohol death rate figures

07.02.17

Commenting on today’s figures from ONS showing a fall in the number of deaths from alcohol Dave Roberts Director General of the Alcohol Information Partnership said

“Today’s figures are encouraging news. In the UK people are drinking less than in previous years. The vast majority of people drink within the Governments new guidelines and in a convivial manner.

The U.K. is a good example of how partnerships between the public sector, retailers, licensees and industry can help deliver positive results.”

ENDS

Response to Brown and Williams letter re cost of alcohol to society

03.01.17

Sir – Katherine Brown and Roger Williams are wrong to make exaggerated claims about the cost of alcohol to society (letter 1st February).  Their claim of £52billion does not appear in the recent Public Health England report.

Reflecting on similar claims about the cost of alcohol that proved to be unreliable it can be assumed that these new extravagant figures are based on flimsy evidence and assumptions designed to mislead. The huge and inflated costs used tend to include a significant percentage (circa70%) of indirect and vague social costs, with police services being as low as 3% of the total and the NHS at little more than 10%.

The Institute of Alcohol Studies (IAS), which receives its funding from the Alliance House Foundation (formerly the UK Temperance Alliance) – is a ring leader of the anti-alcohol lobby. It is in the interests of IAS to present the UK as a wild west where excessive alcohol consumption is plaguing our lives.  Katherine Brown and others habitually mislead, as we saw when Public Health England, advised by Ms Brown, mistakenly claimed to the media that alcohol consumption in the UK had tripled over the past few decades, when in fact it is the same today as it was in the 1970s and has fallen for the past 13 years.

Official Government figures show that in the UK people are drinking less each year, that underage drinking is falling, alcohol related crime is down and binge drinking is reducing. The number of people that choose not to drink alcohol has increased to nearly 20%.  The vast majority of those that do choose to drink do so within the new CMO guidelines and in a convivial manner.

The public sector, retailers, licensees and industry continue to work tirelessly to reduce harm caused by inappropriate alcohol consumption. Their work is made harder when people make exaggerated claims in order to pursue their own ideological agenda.

ENDS

Response to Gilmore and Moriarty letter

3.01.17

Sir Ian Gilmore and Kieran Moriarty are wrong to use partial and misleading evidence to imply that the current pressure on NHS A&E departments could be resolved by increasing the cost of a bottle of wine or spirits. (letter 27th January).

It appears that the data they use is from a survey at one busy urban hospital on a Saturday night and the 70% figure for alcohol related attendances relates to a brief period during the very early hours. The impression they are trying to give is that we are experiencing an outbreak of wild drunkenness that is bringing our NHS to its knees.

Government data paints a very different picture. The past 13 years have seen consumption fall, underage drinking falling year on year and alcohol related crime and drink driving down and young people drink less now than they have ever done.  While there remain a minority that drink irresponsibly and need targeted support the vast majority of people that choose to drink alcohol do so within the Chief Medical Officers new guidelines and in a convivial manner.

Public services, retailers, licenses and the industry continue to work hard to reduce harm caused by inappropriate drinking . Their task is undermined and made harder when eminent individuals make misleading claims to support a preferred policy position.

ENDS

Councillors might be confused -Letter to Manchester Evening News

27.01.17

I write with regard to the recent article Politicians call for watershed on alcohol TV ads to protect kids that reported some local politicians desire to restrict the times alcohol can be advertised on TV. The politicians expressed concern for underage drinking and the drinking habits of young people and linked this to a rise in hospital admissions.

It appears that the Councillors involved in this campaign may be confused or have not been given the full picture.  Official data shows that young people in the UK drink less and less every year and that underage drinking continues to fall as attitudes among teenagers harden against the appropriateness of underage drinking.

The article quotes Councillors from Trafford and Stockport – readers may be interested to know that in Trafford, Stockport and across the region admissions to hospital for underage drinking continue to fall.  In Trafford Public Health England data shows that since 2006/7 the admission rate has more than halved from 69.7 per 100,000 to 32.1 and is now below the national average.  In Stockport, admissions fell 32% since 2006/07.  Underage admissions do need to fall further and more work needs to be done, for example to enforce the law on the underage purchasing of alcohol.

Official data shows that the consumption of alcohol per head in the UK has fallen over the past decade and the number of teetotallers has increased to nearly 20%.  Recent data has also shown that the vast majority of those that choose to drink alcohol do so within the Chief Medical Officers new reduced guideline amounts.

Experience in France shows that introducing additional restrictions on advertising does little to reduce youth drinking as teenage consumption rates have risen since the introduction of the Loi Evin 20 years ago.

In the UK reductions in underage and youth drinking are being achieved by interested parties working together to target harm – not through additional state regulation or restrictions.

Yours

Dave Roberts

Director General

Statement in response to State of Child’s Health Report from RCPCH

26.01.17

Commenting on the State of Child’s Health Report Dave Roberts Director General of the Alcohol Information Partnership said 

Underage consumption of alcohol in the UK has been falling for many years as young people themselves develop a less accepting attitude to underage drinking. In the last decade, the proportion of secondary school pupils who thought it was OK to get drunk has fallen from 46% to 24% (HSCICand the proportion of children aged 11-15 that have had an alcoholic drink has declined by 38%  (HSCIC). 

According to data from the government Health and Social Care Information Centre the number of children that have had a drink in the past week is now at only 8%.

In every region of England underage hospital admissions due to alcohol are falling, including in those areas that in the past have been disproportionately affected by alcohol-related harms, such as the North West (down  54%) and North East (down 46%). (PHE

While the fall in underage drinking is to be welcomed it is important that family members and friends do not facilitate children drinking by buying alcohol on behalf of a young person.

Partnerships between retailers, public services, licensees and industry are working to prevent the purchase of alcohol by underage teenagers. It is through these partnerships that further progress can be made.

ENDS

 

Statement on the special edition of Addiction on alcohol marketing

10.01.17 

Commenting on the special edition of Addiction on alcohol marketing Dave Roberts Director General of the Alcohol Information Partnership said

This report appears to have little to offer the UK.

In the UK alcohol consumption, harmful drinking and underage drinking have all been falling year on year. 

Official data shows the vast majority of people drink in moderation and in a convivial manner. A self-regulatory framework and a partnership approach have clearly been working.

The best way to reduce alcohol related harm is to target programmes and policies at harmful drinkers.

Instead of restricting companies freedom to operate and compete it would be better for Government to focus on understanding what has worked so well over the past decade and encourage more of the same.  Where there are pockets of harm intervention should be directed towards those communities or age groups.

In the UK there is no evidence to show that alcohol sponsorship increases consumption or misuse of alcohol, either by adults or by those who are underage, or that bans on alcohol sponsorship are effective in addressing harmful drinking.

 Self-regulation is the most appropriate and cost effective way to ensure responsible advertising and marketing.

Unfortunately there is a misperception that believes self-regulation is simply the industry sitting in judgement on itself. It isn’t, and it shouldn’t be. There is also a misperception that self-regulation is incapable of moving quickly; in reality, relying on the courts to rule on individual code breaches would be much slower, more expensive and less efficient. 

Under self-regulatory systems, consumers get a fast, concrete answer to their concerns: complaints are usually handled within three to 30 working days, which is much faster than court actions. The process avoids red tape and lengthy procedures, relieving the burden on the legal system and costs tax payers nothing. Rules can be adapted quickly as society and technology change, providing an additional layer of protection to consumers without the need for lengthy legislative procedures.

 For more info please call Dave on 07733323350

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comment on new data from HSCIC on alcohol consumption

14.12.16

Commenting on todays from HSCIC Dave Roberts Director General of the Alcohol Information Partnership said

The data shows that most people in the UK continue to enjoy a drink in a convivial and moderate manner.                                   

The continued trend in reduced underage drinking to the lowest levels ever recorded is an example of the effective work being done by local partnerships across the country.  Working together at a local level is producing welcome results as we see fewer children drinking and younger adults adopting more moderate drinking patterns.

There are still some areas of England and particular groups in society where more work needs to be done to reduce alcohol misuse. Partnerships between industry, licensees, the public services and retailers are the best way to achieve the desired reduction in alcohol misuse.

It is clear that the local partnership approach taken at the moment is working. In many towns and cities the public services, industry, licensees and retailers are working together to produce significant changes.

Todays figures reflect the controversial changes made by the Chief Medical officer to the drinking guidelines in January 2016. By reducing the male guideline from 21 to 14 units per week, 2.5 million men who were drinking at sensible levels were reclassified overnight as riskier drinkers.  This change from the CMO has given a statistical increase in risky drinking of 12%.  The new data shows that the average male consumption is 14.9 units per week, less than it was 5 years ago.  Under the old established guidance this average would have been classified as well inside the lowest risk category. 

During the festive season those that choose to drink alcohol should remember to drink in moderation and never drink and drive.

 ENDS

 

For further information please contact Dave Roberts on 07733323350

 

comment on All Party Parliamentary Group report on alcohol and emergency services

6.12.16

Commenting on the All Party Parliamentary Group on Alcohol Harm report released today Dave Roberts Director General of the Alcohol Information Partnership said

“All anti-social behavior, violence or abuse is totally unacceptable and the perpetrators should be punished.

Having had a drink is no excuse for abusive or violent behavior, when out for the night or at home.

When out for a fun night with friends the vast majority of people enjoy having a drink in a convivial manner without causing any trouble at all.

It is only a disruptive minority that damage our night time economy and spoil the fun for sensible and responsible drinkers having a good time in pubs, clubs, bars and restaurants. Any response to the problems should acknowledge the current decline in consumption and build on the good partnership work being done already to reduce harm.

Any response should avoid punishing the vast majority because of the behavior of a minority. For example according to the Office of National Statistics harmful drinking has fallen by 22% since 2005 and the number of violent incidents committed by offenders perceived to be under the influence of alcohol has fallen by 40% since 2007.”

ENDS

Comment on “The public health burden of alcohol: evidence review”

2/12/16

Commenting on today’s comprehensive alcohol report from Public Health England Dave Roberts Director General of the Alcohol Information Partnership said

Today’s report from PHE is comprehensive in nature and is a contribution to understanding the role of alcohol in society and the options for reducing harm caused by misuse.

PHE are claiming that we are now drinking ‘twice  as much’ as we did 40 years ago. In fact in the UK we drink almost exactly the same amount today as we did in 1976 (HMRC) and less than we did 10 years ago. (www.portmangroup.org.uk/research/trends-in-alcohol )

It appears that PHE are contradicting the government’s own figures.

The report fails to acknowledge the positive trends in the UK (see details below)

In the UK alcohol consumption is falling, alcohol specific hospital admissions among the under 18s and under 40s are reducing and harmful drinking is in decline.  The work being done by all involved has clearly been working.

Minimum Unit Pricing is an untested policy built on modelling and forecasting, the evidence behind its claims is poor and controversial.

MUP has the potential to penalise moderate and responsible drinkers and increase the cost of enjoying a convivial drink without tackling serious misuse.

Any harm caused by alcohol is always serious.  However the vast majority of people who choose to drink do so in moderation and in a convivial manner

The data indicates that to reduce the risk of harm people should eat well, exercise, not smoke and if they choose to drink alcohol they should do so in moderation and within guidelines.

 

ENDS

 

For further information please call Dave on 07733323350

 

Key positive trends in alcohol:

 Alcohol Consumption:

In the last decade alcohol consumption has fallen by 18%.  (HMRC, BBPA)

Today, the UK drinks less alcohol than 16 other European countries: Germany, France, Portugal, Ireland , Poland, Slovenia, Luxembourg, Croatia, Finland, Latvia, Serbia, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania and Lithuania (World Health Organisation)

Drinking patterns:

On average, 76% of adults (84% of women and 68% of men) do not exceed low risk guidelines – 14 units per week (HSCIC)

Harmful drinking (more than 9 units for women or 12 units for men in a single occasion) has fallen by 22% since 2005 (ONS)

Overall, binge drinking (more than 6 units for women or 8 units for men in a single occasion) has fallen by 14% since 2005. Binge drinking among the 16-24 and 25-44 age groups has fallen 33% and 20% respectively. (ONS)

Overall, the proportion of adults drinking in the last week has declined by 9% since 2005. (ONS)

The proportion of adults who drank on five or more days in the last week has declined by 33% since 2005. (ONS)

Underage Drinking:

The proportion of children (11-15 years old) who have had an alcoholic drink has declined 38% since 2004 (HSCIC)

In the last decade, the proportion of secondary school pupils who thought it was OK to try alcohol has fallen by 28%  (HSCIC)

In the last decade, the proportion of secondary school pupils who thought it was OK to get drunk has fallen by 42% (HSCIC)

Alcohol-related crime:

The number of violent incidents committed by offenders perceived to be under the influence of alcohol has fallen by 40% since 2007. (ONS)

The proportion of people witnessing alcohol-related anti-social behaviour has fallen 18% since 2011/12 (since data collection began) (ONS)

The proportion of people who found alcohol-related anti-social behaviour to be a ‘very’ or ‘fairly big’ problem in their area has fallen by 25% since 2005/6. (ONS)

Drink Driving:

The total number of drink driving casualties (slight, serious and killed) has fallen by 52% since 2004. (DfT)

The number of drink-driving deaths has fallen by 85% since 1979 (DfT)

The total number of drink driving accidents (slight, serious and killed) has fallen by 50% since 2004. (DfT)

 

Comment on Cancer Research UK report on alcohol and cancer

18.11.16

Commenting on the recent report from Cancer Research UK (CRUK) and Sheffield University on the link between alcohol consumption and cancer, specifically oesophageal cancer, Dave Roberts, Director General of the Alcohol Information Partnership, said

According to the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 the UK overall age-standardized death rate attributed to alcohol use has fallen by 7.5% since 2005.*

The CRUK report concludes that oesophageal cancer will see the largest increase by 2035.

According to CRUK oesophageal cancer accounts for 2% of all new cancers in the UK and that a person’s risk depends on many factors including age, genetics and exposure to life style risks.  Information from CRUK states that 66% of cases are linked to smoking.

This report appears to be somewhat at odds with CRUKs website that states deaths from oesophageal cancer have fallen by 8% over the last decade and are set to fall by a further 16% by 2035 and that for the past 10 years overall rates have remained stable with a 5% decrease in women.

Alcohol consumption in the UK has fallen over the past decade with a 32% fall in harmful drinking among young people and a 61% fall in the number drinking alcohol in the past 5 days.

An increased risk of cancer is always serious.  However, the data suggests that to reduce the risk of cancer adults should avoid smoking, eat well, exercise and if they choose to drink alcohol they should do so in moderation and within government guidelines.

* GBD 2015 Risk Factors Collaborators. (2015). Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks, 1990–2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. The Lancet, Volume 388 (10053): p1447-1850.

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)31679-8/fulltext

http://vizhub.healthdata.org/gbd-compare/

 

entry content

18.11.16

Commenting on the recent report from Cancer Research UK (CRUK) and Sheffield University on the link between alcohol consumption and cancer, specifically oesophageal cancer, Dave Roberts, Director General of the Alcohol Information Partnership, said

According to the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 the UK overall age-standardized death rate attributed to alcohol use has fallen by 7.5% since 2005.*

The CRUK report concludes that oesophageal cancer will see the largest increase by 2035.

According to CRUK oesophageal cancer accounts for 2% of all new cancers in the UK and that a person’s risk depends on many factors including age, genetics and exposure to life style risks.  Information from CRUK states that 66% of cases are linked to smoking.

This report appears to be somewhat at odds with CRUKs website that states deaths from oesophageal cancer have fallen by 8% over the last decade and are set to fall by a further 16% by 2035 and that for the past 10 years overall rates have remained stable with a 5% decrease in women.

Alcohol consumption in the UK has fallen over the past decade with a 32% fall in harmful drinking among young people and a 61% fall in the number drinking alcohol in the past 5 days.

An increased risk of cancer is always serious.  However, the data suggests that to reduce the risk of cancer adults should avoid smoking, eat well, exercise and if they choose to drink alcohol they should do so in moderation and within government guidelines.

* GBD 2015 Risk Factors Collaborators. (2015). Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks, 1990–2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. The Lancet, Volume 388 (10053): p1447-1850.

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)31679-8/fulltext

http://vizhub.healthdata.org/gbd-compare/

 

Contact

Dave Roberts

07733 323350

dave@alcoholinfopartnership.co.uk